Research

From my grandfather, I learned that the pursuit of knowledge is inherently a selfish act, and to share it with others is the noblest thing one can do. 

The decision to become a professor and teach and conduct research at the college level is one that has been on my mind since birth. For years, I sat at the kitchen table with my grandfather listening to him teach me the history of the world. His love for education, his passion for traveling, and his desire to understand cultures outside of his own is what shaped my interest in other cultures. From him, I learned that the pursuit of knowledge is inherently a selfish act, and to share it with others is the noblest thing one can do.

My field of interest is Socio-Cultural/ Linguistic Anthropology with a focus on Jewish Studies. I’m currently developing a research project considering the migration patterns of Jews to the Dominican Republic and other Caribbean Islands. It will follow two different diasporic timelines: Post-1492 and the expulsion from Spain, as well as Post-1939 and the end of World War II.

My identity has been shaped by my Dominican Heritage, and the Caribbean’s explicit refusal to merge and thus erase the uniqueness of each island’s culture. Because of this, I am intrigued by the Jewish precedence in the Caribbean. A culture which is both shares a collective history and yet is heavily influenced by its various diasporas.